President Trump ends DACA, calls Congress to act

Heard about President Trump’s decision to rescind the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, also known as DACA? Confused about what this means? We’re going to dive into the decision and what it means for America’s young immigrants.

If you don’t know what the program entails – let’s start from the beginning. DACA is a program then-President Obama put in place in 2012 to protect young undocumented immigrants from deportation. Most, if not all, of these young children were brought to America with their parents against their own volition not knowing what they were doing was illegal. Under the program, DACA recipients are known as “dreamers.” Over 800,000 dreamers were eligible to receive a renewable two-year deferred action from deportation while furthering their education or working – until President Trump ended the program.

While his decision to end DACA is controversial, as is most of his decisions, the program has had its problems from the beginning. Republicans hated the program and called it an abuse of executive power on Obama’s behalf. Our very own, Rep. Steve King (R-Iowa), spoke out against DACA in 2012 saying “The point here is…the President does not have the authority to waive immigration law, nor does he have the authority to create it out of thin air, and he’s done both with these Morton memos in this respect.”

But for many of his voters, this decision shouldn’t come as a surprise. As a candidate he ran his campaign on the platform that he would be hard on illegal immigration. Remember the whole “wall” situation and all. It seems that he is living up to his promises with the ending of DACA. Although, he did give Congress a six-month loophole to bring a similar program to his desk and he would the revisit the issue. If Congress wasn’t able to conjuror something up, he promised to revisit the situation himself. A bit confusing, huh?

As for the 800,000 dreamers who are now living in limbo, their fate has yet to be seen. For the next six months they will be living in anguish not knowing if they will return to a land they may have never visited or speak a language they may not know.

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